Project Report For Agriculture Warehouse

Introduction

Project report for Agriculture Warehouse is as follows.

The Indian economy is an agricultural economy, with agriculture employing more than 70% of the population. From 1994-95, when production was 192 million metric tonnes (MMT), to an all-time high of 232 MMT in 2010-11 (15 years), Indian food grain production has climbed at an average rate of 1.20 per cent, and with a favourable monsoon forecast for FY12, the upswing is expected to continue. Rice accounts for around 94 MMT (41% of total food grain output) while wheat accounts for approximately 82 MMT (42%). (35 per cent).

Furthermore, Rabi and Kharif crop output is now about equal as a result of Rabi crop development due to the increasing production of wheat, rice, cereals, and pulses. All of this has resulted in a significant increase in the need for storage capacity in India.

To match foodgrain output to consumption (for both Kharif and Rabi crops), a total peak storage capacity of roughly 70% of yearly production is necessary. With an annual foodgrain output of 232 MMT, the needed storage capacity is around 162 MMT, indicating a 70 MMT storage capacity gap at current levels. The base of the wastage level might be used to confirm this. So, with a waste rate of roughly 30% (and a production level of 232 MMT), the shortfall storage capacity is around 70 MMT.

Market potential & Strategy

The Indian economy is an agricultural economy, with agriculture employing more than 70% of the population. From 1994-95, when production was 192 million metric tonnes (MMT), to an all-time high of 232 MMT in 2010-11 (15 years), Indian food grain production has climbed at an average rate of 1.20 per cent, and with a favourable monsoon forecast for FY12, the upswing is expected to continue.

Rice accounts for around 94 MMT (41% of total food grain output) while wheat accounts for approximately 82 MMT (42%). (35 per cent). Furthermore, Rabi and Kharif crop output is now about equal as a result of Rabi crop development due to the increasing production of wheat, rice, cereals, and pulses. All of this has resulted in a significant increase in the need for storage capacity in India.

Due to a lack of covered storage capacity for food grains, which was approximately 47.55 MMT as of March 31, 2000, and to progressively increasing government stocks, a significant amount of food grains had to be stored under open Cover and Plinth (CAP) storage and, to a lesser extent, in hired capacities, primarily from 2000 to 2003.

The years 2020-23 will witness the highest-ever levels of food grain acquisition by government agencies, putting a significant strain on existing storage facilities. Higher minimum support prices (MSP), improved reach, and therefore higher procurement all contributed to farmers receiving better and more remunerative rates. It did, however, put pressure on available storage capacity with State entities participating in procurement.

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